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20121224
20130101
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the fiscal cliff issues. on taxes president obama's offer compromise, agreeing to $400,000 as the new cutoff point. speaker boehner tried to sell a million as the dividing line but couldn't get it past his own party. president obama is therefore offering his original position, $250,000 and below. on spending cuts president obama proposed $1.2 trillion, about equal to what he was asking in revenue. boehner passed draconian spending cuts in the house with no revenue component. on extended unemployment insurance, another check for the president. nada for boehner. on the debt limit president obama proposed a structure similar to what republican leader mitch mcconnell proposed last year. boehner wants to hold the nation's full faith and credit hostage once again to attain even more spending cuts. president obama even threw in an added incentive for republicans, by agreeing to a change in the way social security increases are calculated. no such olive branch was ever extended by republicans. get your cell phones out. i want to know what you think. tonight's question, is john boehner's move to reco
to follow through on an up or down vote. reid said in a statement -- "at president obama's request, i am readying a bill for a vote by monday that will prevent a tax hike on middle class families, making up to $250,000, and that will include the additional critical provisions outlined by president obama." president obama pointed out the danger of inaction. >> the economy is growing, but sustaining that trend is going to require elected officials to do their jobs. the housing market is recovering, but that could be impacted if folks are seeing smaller paychecks. the unemployment rate is the lowest it's been since 2008. but already, you're seeing businesses and consumers starting to hold back, because of the dysfunction that they see in washington. >> the president's stern statement echoed the concerns of the american people, who are tired of washington gridlock. >> outside of washington, nobody understands how it is, that this seems to be a repeat pattern, over and over again. ordinary folks, they do their jobs. they meet deadlines. they sit down and they discuss things and then things ha
barrasso on president obama's position. >> i think the president is eager to go over the cliff for political purposes. i think he sees a political victory at the bottom of the cliff. he gets all this additional tax revenue for programs. he gets to cut the military, and he gets to blame republicans for it. >> let's take the cynicism out of that, let's ask the question, is there in fact some benefit to going over the cliff? >> i think that there is. i don't think that the president does want to go over the cliff. i think he's made it extremely clear that he doesn't. and that's because he -- the president is not that much of a risk taker, he would rather come to a deal. he's eager to come to a deal. i don't think he's kidding, hen watts a big deal. he just doesn't have a partner on the other side. he's right and republicans know he's right. if you go over the cliff at this point tax rates go up, on dividends, capital gains and estate taxes go up. republicans want them down, they have to actively push to force them down. democrats only have to lower them for some elements of the po
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)